“Unable to expire password for root” – Debian 9 in vCloud Director

Debian 9 was released on 17th of June 2017, and for me, it was not only the information about the arriving upgrades. Also, it was the sign of the new vCloud Director template. I started making it on Monday, and I faced the problem with customization. Of course, I used Open-VM-Tools because I try to use them everywhere. I had many problems with customization, but it was the first time when I had a problem with password customization on a Linux guest OS – I got “unable to expire password for root” error. Fortunately, I took one look at the Continue reading

Cannot customize CentOS on vCloud Director

Last week I spent some time creating and updating vCloud Director templates. It’s a very long process if you want to do everything perfectly. You know, one mistake and you have to deploy the vApp, change the configuration, update metadata and add vApp to catalog one more time. During this process, I faced the problem with CentOS 7.3. It was a fresh installation from official DVD iso. Everything worked fine except one thing – customization. Of course, I chose the open-vm-tools package and made sure that daemon is running, but customization didn’t want to work properly. Finally, I found the Continue reading

Alias for Connect-VIServer arguments – PowerShell functions

I think most of you agree with me when I say that typing “Connect-VIServer -Server name-of-server” is very annoying. Especially when you have many vCenter Servers to manage. First thing that comes to everybody’s mind is “hey, we can use PowerShell aliases”! And yes, but only for shorten cmdlet. You can have some problems with passing parameters into the alias. But don’t worry, there is another – better in my opinion – way to do that. Functions. It’s a simple way for creating aliases for Connect-VIServer arguments. Without further ado, there you are a template of the mentioned functions: View the code Continue reading

Fun with PowerCLI – how to get Windows VMs in vCloud Director

Honestly speaking, I’m in love with PowerCLI. I know that VMware admin cannot optimize his job without PowerCLI, but in my case it’s a higher level of scripting love. At first, I want to stress that my scripting experience started with Linux systems and its scripting languages. I have been in awe of how excellent PowerShell can be since I decided to simplify my work with Windows Servers. Of course VMware administration has enforced me to become friends with PowerShell. New cmdlets, new possibilities, and – last but not least – the best way for managing and configuring VMware vSphere Continue reading